overdolibrarian

overdo and overdue - that's me!

1,257 notes

effyeahnerdfighters:

Attacked by Squirrels and Neoclassicism: Thoughts from Places, Washington D.C.

In which John is threatened by an utterly fearless squirrel and contemplates the neoclassical architecture of our nation’s capital, Washington, D.C. Along the way, he and the Yeti visit several museums; look at the art of China’s most important living artist, Ai Weiwei; visit the Washington Monument, the Lincoln Memorial, and the World War II Memorial; and consider the history of cars that are also boats.

What is up with the squirrels today?! Strange coincidence.

Filed under squirrel

23,902 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

Everybody was told to make a funny face, but I didn’t get the memo.
Esther Earl would’ve been 18 tomorrow, a real adult. I miss her. 
It’s very easy to turn the dead into Lessons for the Living—to say that Esther taught me to Live Life or To Be Grateful or Not To Take Beauty for Granted. But honestly, in my opinion at least, any lessons learned from her death could’ve been learned in some other, easier way. I think the universe overall would be better off if she were still making videos.
I am so glad that I knew Esther, and that she was a nerdfighter, and that through Esther’s family and This Star Won’t Go Out we can still decrease suck with her. But I am also really pissed off that she died. 
She was young, blessed with a genuinely sophomoric sense of humor, silly, empathetic, madly in love with her friends and family, and a very gifted writer. It’s hard to isolate why, but I’ve never liked a teenager so much—at least not since I was a teenager. She was just really cool, in the best sense of the word. She never made me feel uncomfortable. She listened to me and responded thoughtfully, and was also happy to tell me I was full of shit. 
(On the day this picture was taken, I generally did a not-great job of being an Adult and cried a lot, and at one point Esther was talking about her complicated relationship with the idea of heaven, and I answered that there were all kinds of ways of imagining an infinite afterlife, some of which weren’t even necessarily that supernatural, and she just cocked me a look like, “You need to learn the meaning of the word infinite.” She was right, of course. Back in my hotel room that night, I jotted down easy comfort isn’t comforting, which ended up in TFiOS.) 
The nearly two years since her death have complicated my relationship with Esther because now of course there is not only time but a book between us: I could never have written The Fault in Our Stars without knowing Esther. Every word on that book depends upon her.
But at the same time, I don’t want people conflating Esther with Hazel (they’re very different), and it’s extremely important to me that I not claim to be telling Esther’s story. Esther’s story belongs to Esther and to her family, and they will tell it brilliantly and beautifully.
When I was doing publicity for the book, lots of reporters wanted me to talk about Esther because these days novels “based on a true story” do so much better than novels that are just novels. I never really knew how to deal with these questions, and I still don’t, because the truth (as always) is complicated: Esther inspired the story in the sense that I was very angry after her death and wrote constantly, with a focus and passion I hadn’t known since I was rewriting Looking for Alaska in 2003. And Esther helped me to imagine teenagers as more empathetic than I’d given them credit for. And her charm and snark inspired the novel, as did her idea of incorporating an author she liked into her Wish. But the story is also inspired by many other people—by my son, by my wife, by the kids I knew and loved who died in the children’s hospital when I was a student chaplain, by my own parents (my dad is a cancer survivor), etc.
I wish she’d read TFiOS. I suspect she would’ve found it a bit far-fetched, but I do hope she’d have enjoyed it anyway. I’ll never know, though. I am astonished that the book has found such a broad audience, but the person I most want to read it never will.
Esther has become a hero in our community, and the heroic narrative doesn’t always line up perfectly with the person she was. (Heroic narratives never do.) But this much was true, at least as far as I knew her: She was generous, and loving, and full of grace—which was, after all, her middle name.
Plus, she knew how to make a funny face on cue.
When I told Esther we wanted to celebrate her birthday as long as there were vlogbrothers videos, and that videos on that day could be about whatever she wanted them to be about, she waited a couple weeks before getting back to me. She finally decided she wanted it to be a day that celebrated love in families and among friends. I think of Esther Day as a kind of Valentine’s Day for all the other kinds of love.
It was a brilliant idea, Esther. Thank you for Esther Day. Thank you for helping me say to my family and friends what I still hope I can say to you, even over the great divide: I love you.
(You can support This Star Won’t Go Out, the organization founded in Esther’s memory that helps families of children with cancer, directly here or by buying a TSWGO wristband.)

fishingboatproceeds:

Everybody was told to make a funny face, but I didn’t get the memo.

Esther Earl would’ve been 18 tomorrow, a real adult. I miss her. 

It’s very easy to turn the dead into Lessons for the Living—to say that Esther taught me to Live Life or To Be Grateful or Not To Take Beauty for Granted. But honestly, in my opinion at least, any lessons learned from her death could’ve been learned in some other, easier way. I think the universe overall would be better off if she were still making videos.

I am so glad that I knew Esther, and that she was a nerdfighter, and that through Esther’s family and This Star Won’t Go Out we can still decrease suck with her. But I am also really pissed off that she died. 

She was young, blessed with a genuinely sophomoric sense of humor, silly, empathetic, madly in love with her friends and family, and a very gifted writer. It’s hard to isolate why, but I’ve never liked a teenager so much—at least not since I was a teenager. She was just really cool, in the best sense of the word. She never made me feel uncomfortable. She listened to me and responded thoughtfully, and was also happy to tell me I was full of shit. 

(On the day this picture was taken, I generally did a not-great job of being an Adult and cried a lot, and at one point Esther was talking about her complicated relationship with the idea of heaven, and I answered that there were all kinds of ways of imagining an infinite afterlife, some of which weren’t even necessarily that supernatural, and she just cocked me a look like, “You need to learn the meaning of the word infinite.” She was right, of course. Back in my hotel room that night, I jotted down easy comfort isn’t comforting, which ended up in TFiOS.) 

The nearly two years since her death have complicated my relationship with Esther because now of course there is not only time but a book between us: I could never have written The Fault in Our Stars without knowing Esther. Every word on that book depends upon her.

But at the same time, I don’t want people conflating Esther with Hazel (they’re very different), and it’s extremely important to me that I not claim to be telling Esther’s story. Esther’s story belongs to Esther and to her family, and they will tell it brilliantly and beautifully.

When I was doing publicity for the book, lots of reporters wanted me to talk about Esther because these days novels “based on a true story” do so much better than novels that are just novels. I never really knew how to deal with these questions, and I still don’t, because the truth (as always) is complicated: Esther inspired the story in the sense that I was very angry after her death and wrote constantly, with a focus and passion I hadn’t known since I was rewriting Looking for Alaska in 2003. And Esther helped me to imagine teenagers as more empathetic than I’d given them credit for. And her charm and snark inspired the novel, as did her idea of incorporating an author she liked into her Wish. But the story is also inspired by many other people—by my son, by my wife, by the kids I knew and loved who died in the children’s hospital when I was a student chaplain, by my own parents (my dad is a cancer survivor), etc.

I wish she’d read TFiOS. I suspect she would’ve found it a bit far-fetched, but I do hope she’d have enjoyed it anyway. I’ll never know, though. I am astonished that the book has found such a broad audience, but the person I most want to read it never will.

Esther has become a hero in our community, and the heroic narrative doesn’t always line up perfectly with the person she was. (Heroic narratives never do.) But this much was true, at least as far as I knew her: She was generous, and loving, and full of grace—which was, after all, her middle name.

Plus, she knew how to make a funny face on cue.

When I told Esther we wanted to celebrate her birthday as long as there were vlogbrothers videos, and that videos on that day could be about whatever she wanted them to be about, she waited a couple weeks before getting back to me. She finally decided she wanted it to be a day that celebrated love in families and among friends. I think of Esther Day as a kind of Valentine’s Day for all the other kinds of love.

It was a brilliant idea, Esther. Thank you for Esther Day. Thank you for helping me say to my family and friends what I still hope I can say to you, even over the great divide: I love you.

(You can support This Star Won’t Go Out, the organization founded in Esther’s memory that helps families of children with cancer, directly here or by buying a TSWGO wristband.)

Filed under John Green books reading authors nerdfighters dftba

781 notes

Me and Books

me:
*just finished reading Harry Potter*
me:
I WANT TO STUDY AT HOGWAAAARTS!
me:
*just finished reading Lord of the Rings*
me:
I want to have an adventure in Middle Earth
me:
*just finished The Lightning Thief*
me:
I wish I was a demigod.
me:
*just finished The Hunger Games*
me:
I'm good.

183 notes

How many librarians does it take to change a lightbulb?

How many public librarians does it take to change a light bulb?
Well, first we'll have to pass a bond measure to pay for the replacement.
How many academic librarians does it take to change a light bulb?
No fewer than three, acting as a committee to determine the best solutions and alternative practices, which, after a lengthy review process, will be presented to custodial staff.
How many catalog(ue) librarians does it take to change a light bulb?
I don't understand why we don't call it an 'Electric Lamp, Incandescent' any more. And in any case, I just changed that light bulb a few years ago.
How many library school students does it take to change a light bulb?
LED light bulbs are a far more efficient technology with a lot of applications in brick-and-mortar information facilities, but it would be even better if we just digitized the collections and put them into accessible silos.
How many emerging technologies librarians does it take to change a light bulb?
Have you tried turning it off and on again?

Filed under librarians funny

3,367 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

effyeahnerdfighters:

The winner of the An Abundance of Katherines cover contest has been announced at BEA, and this is it! Designed by nerdfighter Sarah Turbin. Congrats, Sarah!
Here’s a picture of Sarah, John, and the cover!

The new cover of AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES, designed by 17-year-old longtime nerdfighter Sarah Turbin.
(Her tumblr is wasarahbi but I can’t figure out how to link it on my phone. Follow her!)
I love Sarah’s cover, and I hope you do, too. It should start to show up in stores next week. Thanks to everyone who submitted covers; there were hundreds of amazing ones and it was a very difficult choice.
I had a great time hanging out with Sarah at BEA today.
Also tonight is her prom. (Really.)

fishingboatproceeds:

effyeahnerdfighters:

The winner of the An Abundance of Katherines cover contest has been announced at BEA, and this is it! Designed by nerdfighter Sarah Turbin. Congrats, Sarah!

Here’s a picture of Sarah, John, and the cover!

The new cover of AN ABUNDANCE OF KATHERINES, designed by 17-year-old longtime nerdfighter Sarah Turbin.

(Her tumblr is wasarahbi but I can’t figure out how to link it on my phone. Follow her!)

I love Sarah’s cover, and I hope you do, too. It should start to show up in stores next week. Thanks to everyone who submitted covers; there were hundreds of amazing ones and it was a very difficult choice.

I had a great time hanging out with Sarah at BEA today.

Also tonight is her prom. (Really.)

385 notes

Tumblarians

thelifeguardlibrarian:

Ok, folks. Below is the START of a list of library/librarian-ish tumblrs. Please, if I’ve missed you or your tumblr bff, just drop a note in my ask or email. I’ll throw this in a link on my homepage and I’ll eventually sort by alpha, maybe even by type.

Celebrarians. Word.

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